Under what circumstances if any might

For example, when Jean-Jacques Rousseau states that, "law is the expression of the general will", he is suggesting that the governing body should merely act as a representative to display and enforce the desires of the majority of the people in the society, in order to protect their needs and desires.

However, Rousseau does maintain that the decision of the majority can alter according to just one vote, thus he fails to provide a solution for the possible circumstance in which the large minority are discontented with the present form of government; a situation that may easily lead to revolutionary circumstances.

If however, the governors attempt to usurp this sovereign power, then a revolution may be necessary. Revolutions can most commonly be justified Under what circumstances if any might the majority of the people under a government determine that there is a desperate need for change; when they are necessary for the stabilization of the state; and when the governing body deviates from its duty to protect the people and the state.

This view that the governing body maintains a responsibility to both its people and its state, is a notion frequently put forth by various political thinkers. The word revolution holds many connotations and implications, for it has been continuously evolving in a political sense since the beginning of societal structures and governments.

This concept is one that is addressed to a large extent by John Locke. Due to this notion, Locke ascertains very clearly that the people will "always have the right to While Rousseau does not specifically mention democracy, this form of rule in which the decision of the majority prevails, allows for the change of the governing body simply by a vote.

In this sense, when the people are simply not happy with the present form of government, the revolution need not be violent for at the opening of every one of these assemblies so described by Rousseau, the first question to be asked is; "Does it please the sovereign to maintain the present form of government?

Yet along with the justifications of change based on the will of the majority, there is the notion, as briefly addressed by Rousseau, that the governing body holds a responsibility to its people.

Revolutions can take many forms, varying between social and political, and violent and peaceful, yet while revolutions in this modern sense are deliberate acts, either violent or otherwise, against a given government, they can, under certain circumstances, be justified.

In many societies the state is maintained under a type of democracy in which the governed people may decide the rules and regulations of their state through the vote of the majority.

This notion suggests that revolution is certainly not the solution to disputes and minor discrepancies, for in It is often suggested that the government of a society is primarily designed to protect both the state and the people of that state, thus placing a duty, or responsibility on the government to adhere to the desires of its people.

The justifications of revolution presented by various political theorists often refer to the establishment that is being overthrown and the reasons provided for the dissatisfaction shown towards the established power.

circumstance

If however, the governors attempt to usurp this sovereign power, then a revolution may be necessary. However, in its more modern sense, revolution suggests dramatic episodes of political change, where a collective force recognizes the need for a change and is able to take action to create this in order to remove what they consider to be the impurities of the system, and replace it with what is presumed to be necessary.

Under what circumstances if any might, if this responsibility is neglected or opposed, then the trust must be fortified, and the power given to those who initially gave it; the people.

The justifications of revolution presented by various political theorists often refer to the establishment that is being overthrown and the reasons provided for the dissatisfaction shown towards the established power.

This view that the governing body maintains a responsibility to both its people and its state, is a notion frequently put forth by various political thinkers. In order to maintain the social order, and to ensure that the rules are altered according to the general will, Rousseau explains that general assemblies should be periodically held so as to address any desired alterations.

While Rousseau does not specifically mention democracy, this form of rule in which the decision of the majority prevails, allows for the change of the governing body simply by a vote. Revolutions can take many forms, varying between social and political, and violent and peaceful, yet while revolutions in this modern sense are deliberate acts, either violent or otherwise, against a given government, they can, under certain circumstances, be justified.

It is often suggested that the government of a society is primarily designed to protect both the state and the people of that state, thus placing a duty, or responsibility on the government to adhere to the desires of its people.It may also be modified in various ways, such as under any circumstances meaning “no matter what the situation,” as in We'll phone her under any circumstances; under no circumstances, meaning “in no case, never,” as in Under.

Nov 29,  · Under what circumstances, if any, might the legalization or decriminalization of drugs be beneficial to society? For one thing, instead of criminals getting rich, the government would be able to collect taxes which could be used for both education and mi-centre.com: Resolved.

Under the circumstances/in the circumstances definition: You can use in the circumstances or under the circumstances before or after a statement | Meaning, pronunciation, translations and examples. Definition of under the circumstances/in the circumstances from the Collins English Dictionary May and might Both may and might can be used in requests and in expressions of possibility for the present and future.

The use of force to prevent the escape of an arrested person from custody is justifiable when the force could have been employed to effect the arrest under which the person is in custody, except that a guard employed by a correctional facility or a peace officer is justified in using any force, including deadly force, that he reasonably.

under the circumstances In consideration of what is currently happening. Under the circumstances, I think you should rest—you are just getting over a cold, after all. Under the circumstances, I think we could consider ourselves lucky—it could have been a lot worse.

See also: circumstance under the circumstances Fig.

under the circumstances

in a particular situation.

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Under what circumstances if any might
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